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Hooked On Phonics Review

Hooked on Phonics

 I want to talk about “Hooked on Phonics” today, as a tool to use in your homeschooling efforts.

My parents used this program, 40 some years ago with my brother who it turns out had dyslexia (they did not know that at the time).

He was having a horrible time in school, just couldn’t seem to learn to read or remember what he had just read.  So, mom got the “Hooked on Phonics” program on reel to reel… I told you this stuff has been around for a long time!

Anyway, to make a long story short, “Hooked on Phonics” really helped my brother a lot.  It was still many years later before someone at his school figured out his true problem, dyslexia!  (but that is another whole story and partly why I believe so much in homeschooling, for another day though.)

“Hooked on Phonics”, works on the basic principals of teaching your child the sounds of letters and how to sound out words.  I learned this way in school when I was a child and never figured out why it is no longer used in schools, oh yeah, it is old school so it can’t work!

“Hooked on Phonics” has gone through some big changes since the 1970’s when my parents got the program, and it is all for the better. The programs are broken down into grade levels and formatted to use with workbooks that give your child a visual look at the word also, giving the visual and auditor learners each something they can use.

I like the programs, I like the concepts, I think the some of the “old school” ways do work, no matter what our “modern” schools tell us! If you would like to try “Hooked on Phonics”, they have a 30 Day Risk-Free Trial Only $14.95 – Learn More at HookedOnPhonics.com. It is a good way to try the program and see if it can’t help your child. For $14.95 you really can’t lose.

Tell me your story if you have tried “Hooked on Phonics” for your child.


468x60 Teach Your Child To Read

April 30th, 2013

Teaching Your Child at Home

Each child has a unique way of learning. The three learning modalities are the sensory channels we use to obtain and process information. Visual learners process information best with pictures and diagrams; these children learn best seeing things. Auditory learners learn best by listening and discussing things. Kinesthetic learners learn best with a hands on approach. Most children learn through all three learning modalities.

Temperament theory states that all people differ in their interests, attitudes, judgments, and perceptions. This greatly affects how we want to learn, what we want to learn, and the way we learn. When a parent learns what their child temperament style is, they can plan out how to effectively teach their child.

There are four temperament styles: where the attention is focused, how information is acquired, how decisions are made, and work habits and lifestyle.

The child is either extroverted or introverted, which means either focusing on outside objects, people events or inner world of ideas. The child is either sensing, which means the child acquires information from the senses (concrete and present) or intuition, which focuses on insight, inspiration, future, and possibility. The child either makes decisions based on logical analysis and cause and effect (thinking) or on personal values and the affect on the self (feeling). Lastly, the child prefers their life to be orderly and structured (judging) or spontaneous and flexible (perceiving).

Howard Gardner, originator of multiple intelligences, defines seven kinds of intelligence. Most children have strengths in two or three of them and need work on the rest. One kind of intelligence is verbal/linguistic, which is speaking and reading. Another type of intelligence is logical/mathematical, which is concepts and abstract patterns. Another kind of intelligence is visual/special which is thinking in images, pictures, shapes, and colors. Another kind of intelligence is musical, such as rhythm, pitch, melody and harmony. Another type of intelligence is bodily/kinesthetic, which is touch, making, and doing. And yet another type of intelligence is interpersonal, which is relating and cooperating with people. Last but not least is intrapersonal, which is independence and self-motivation.

Learning how your child perceives the world around him/her and learns will allow you to maximize their intellectual strengths and teach them effectively.


April 27th, 2013

10 Reasons to Have Family Meals More Often

When was the last time your family had a meal together? I don’t mean sitting in the car munching on burgers from the drive-through. I mean sitting down at the table and sharing a home-cooked meal.

If you can’t remember when you last enjoyed a family dinner, make plans to have them more often. Experts have found – and continue to discover – plenty of benefits for both children and adults when families have dinner together at least three times a week.

I know…I know, it’s not always easy, so click here if you need help with meal planning and grocery shopping.

Here are 10 reasons why you should have family meals more often:

Good For The Body

1. When families eat together, everyone tends to eat healthier. People who have frequent family meals consume more calcium, fiber, iron, and vitamins B6, B12, C and E. It could be because home-cooked meals are healthier than fast food and restaurant meals. (Source: Archives of Family

Medicine)

2. Children tend to eat more fruits and vegetables when they frequently have dinner with their families. They also tend to eat fewer snack foods. (Source: American Dietetic Association)

3. Children in families who eat dinner together are less likely to be overweight (Source: Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine). This makes sense, given the findings in #1 and #2 above.

Good For The Brain

4. Children from families who eat meals together get better grades than their peers who don’t have lots of family meal times (Source: Lou Harris-Reader’s Digest National Poll). So family dinners are not only good for the body; they’re also good for the brain.

5. When families eat together frequently, children have better language skills compared to kids from families who don’t have family mealtimes often. (Source: Harvard University)

Good For Emotional Health

6. Children of families who eat together report feeling happier and are more optimistic about the future, than their peers who have infrequent family meals. (Source: Lou Harris-Reader’s Digest National Poll)

7. Teenagers are less likely to use drugs, smoke, and drink alcoholic drinks, when their families eat together regularly. (Source: Columbia University)

8. It may come as a surprise, but among Moms who work outside the home, those who have family mealtimes reported feeling less stress than those who had family dinners less often. (Source: Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal)

9. The more often teen girls had meals with their families, the less likely they were to have symptoms of depression and suicidal behaviors. (Source: University of Minnesota)

Good For Family Bonding

10. Eating together gives family members the chance to communicate and build relationships, something that both adults and children appreciate very much. (Source: Nutrition Education Network of Washington & Oprah Winfrey’s “Family Dinner Experiment”)

I hope these reasons motivate you and your family to try and eat together more often. We’re all busy – even children have plenty of after-school activities. But as the list above shows, family meals are worth every effort we put into them. It helps to plan ahead so that we’re not scrambling to get dinner ready or panicking because we don’t have all the ingredients we need.

To make it easier to get the family around the table with a home-cooked meal, check out Dine Without Whine’s menu planning service. It cost just a penny to try it out!

April 15th, 2013

Walking the WAHM Tightrope

Walking the WAHM tightrope – balancing work and family

Sometimes, being a work at home mom can feel like walking on a tight-rope! Balancing your work-time and you family-time can almost feel overwhelming, but it can be done. As a WAHM you are ahead of the game. The following are some tips to help keep you balanced – and sane!

You have the ability to set your own hours, so take advantage of that right now. If you can handle some tasks at “odd hours”, you will have more family time during the day. Are you a morning person? If so, try to get up an hour before your family to take advantage of some “quiet time” to focus on your business; night owls can take care of emails and other administrative tasks after they have put their children to bed.

If you pick your children up from school, use the time you spend waiting for them to get out of class to return customer phone calls. A wireless headset for your cell phone will allow you to keep your hands on the wheel and your eyes on the road if you make calls while driving.

During the week, when schedules are busiest, plan speedy dinners. Let your kids help out in the kitchen while you cook – you’ll be spending time together and teaching them skills they will need. There are plenty of cookbooks out there dedicated to “kid friendly recipes” if you need some inspiration on what to make.

Blend family time and work time by getting your children involved in your business. Smaller children can affix the stamps or mailing labels; older children can help hang flyers; and teenagers can take on some administrative tasks such as data entry.

Set aside some time each day to spend with your children with no distractions. You don’t have to go anywhere special; the time can be spent reading a book or playing a game. The point is just to let your children know that they come first, and the business comes second. Remember – you became a work at home mom so you could spend time with your family. Don’t forget to take some time out to enjoy them!


March 26th, 2013

What to do With Christmas Leftovers?

pork_1_bg_102702What to Do with Christmas Dinner Leftovers

It’s fun (well, for most of us…I think!) to have the entire family together for a Christmas dinner. You share good food and good times on that special day of the year. But, what happens to the food once the meal is over?

Well, I’ve got 8 ideas for you and hope they’ll come in handy.

Make soup. Soup is a very comforting and warming dish when the temperature begins to dip. Using chicken or beef broth, you can use your leftovers to make some chicken noodle soup, turkey noodle soup or even beef stew. Here is my fast and easy Turkey Soup Recipe.

Freeze them. Freezing means that you can enjoy your Christmas fare at anytime. If you use plastic storage bags, make sure that they are freezer bags and write the date of freezing on the outside. When you divide food into portion sizes then you can thaw out only what you need and not the entire lot.

Send guests home with food. Why keep all the bounty to yourself? Load up on reusable food containers (in festive colors) so that each guest can take home some food for later.

Make a salad. Green salads can be so boring sometimes. Add a slice or two of turkey, beef, chicken or ham to spice it up. Leftover meats make great salad toppers. Or you can dice them up and make a Turkey Salad Spread for sandwiches or to put on crackers.

Breakfast additions. Omelets are fun to make. Even more fun than making them is adding different items to them to see what kind of combinations you can come up with. Use leftover Christmas dinner fare to decorate your omelet. Ham can be diced to use as an omelet add-in. Leftover vegetables can also be cut up to sprinkle inside an omelet.

Go eastern. Did you have steak for Christmas dinner? Cut the leftovers into thin strips. With a few stir-fry vegetables you have created a new dinner meal. If stir fry is not your cup of tea, you can make lo mien, fried rice and other Asian dishes that include steak. Or if you had the traditional turkey, go wild with turkey chow mein.

Casseroles are always a hit. Who doesn’t love a good casserole? With Christmas dinner leftovers, you can whip up a casserole for any meal. With breakfast, combine ham, veggies and shredded cheese with egg for an after Christmas treat. For lunch, use some turkey, rice, cream soup and vegetables for a midday meal. For dinner, try chicken, vegetables, noodles and cream of chicken soup for an easy all-in-one meal that takes less than an hour to cook.

Create a pie. This is not the sweet treat but a dinner pie. Turkey or chicken and even beef can be placed inside a crust with tons of delicious veggies to make a pot pie your family will love. I always use a store bought crust, because I am just not that into baking!

I know it can be overwhelming when faced with all that leftover food, but hopefully these ideas can make sure nothing goes to waste.




December 26th, 2011

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